Conservative leadership voting enters its final week

The voting process to determine the next Conservative leader/prime minister will close on Friday.

Members of the Conservative party have been voting between Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss since early August to determine who will be the next leader.

Only Conservative party members who joined before 3 June are eligible for voting. Anybody whose membership is expired, suspended, or cancelled cannot vote. An estimated 200,000  members are eligible to vote.

Truss, Sunak have participated in 11 party-hustings events across the nation as well as TV and radio debates in which their views on topics such the cost of living crisis as well the war in Ukraine have been discussed.


Featured

BASC responds the England Deer Strategy


Featured

BASC logo

Northern Ireland Police Service declares Firearms and Explosives Branch “critical incident”

The 12ThThe final hustings event in London will take place on Wednesday, April 12.

Eight Conservative MPs initially entered the race to succeed Boris Johnson, before the party’s MPs whittled that number down in five fast ballots.

Sunak was the first frontrunner and won most votes from Conservative MPs. Truss finished third several times. She was able to make it into the final pairing by eight votes on 20 July, pushing Penny Mordaunt, who was in second for most of the process out of the competition.

However as the contest was migrated over to party members, Truss has overtaken  former chancellor Rishi Sunak as the favourite to win. According to Politico, which has swept data from all major polls and found that Truss currently holds 57% of the votes. Sunak is third with 31%, while Truss is currently taking home 57%. The remaining 11% are undecided or have not voted.

Truss, the bookies favourite, was set to take part in an interview this week evening with the BBC’s Nick Robinson.  However, she pulled out last-minute, with her team saying she could “no longer spare the time” for the event.

Sunak’s campaign have accused Truss of “avoiding scrutiny” and said that swerving this interview suggested she “doesn’t have a plan at all”.