Trump's Ban On Transgender Service Members Faces Major Setback

politics
October 30, 2017Oct 30, 2017

Donald Trump's transgender military ban has stirred quite a bit of controversy. Efforts to stop the transgender ban have been underway in Congress and the media, with the former trying to pass amendments to stop the ban and the latter trying to sway public opinion. But Trump has remained adamant. The cost of including transgender persons in the military, says Trump, is too costly. 

 

Figures like John McCain have been very outspoken against Trump's announcement, which came earlier this year through Twitter. When Trump tweeted about the ban, John McCain responded that the ban was a "step in the wrong direction." John McCain has long been a supporter of gay and transgender persons openly serving in the military. He has also been a fierce opponent to the Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare.

According to another source, after the Obama administration opened up military recruitment to transgender individuals in 2016, Defense Secretary James Mattis began a study on the impact of the change. The study was still being conducted when President Trump announced via Twitter that transgenders will no longer be allowed to serve. 

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/890193981585444864

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/890196164313833472

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/890197095151546369

It is now being reported by NBC News that a federal court in Washington is preventing President Donald Trump from changing the government's policy on military service by transgender people. In particular, U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly remarked Monday that transgender members who sued the government were likely to win their lawsuit. The judge then barred the Trump administration from implementing the ban.

The judge ruled that the plaintiffs "have established that they will be injured by these directives, due both to the inherent inequality they impose, and the risk of discharge and denial of accession that they engender." 

The government had argued that the lawsuit was premature and requested that the case become dismissed since the policy was still subject to review.

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