State Just Ruled To Rob Parents' Rights In A Life-Changing Way

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May 30, 2017May 30, 2017

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A mother in Minnesota was just told by the courts that the state had the right to give her teenage son hormone therapy to help him look like a girl--without her permission or knowledge.  

According to the Christian Post,  Anmarie Calgaro's 17 year old son wanted legal emancipation from her but had not been granted it by the courts. Nevertheless, his school and healthcare provider went ahead and gave him hormone therapy to transition him to being a girl.

"A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by a Minnesota mother against her teenage child along with school officials and healthcare providers on the grounds that they violated her parental rights by treating her son with a hormone therapy to start transitioning into a girl even though he hadn't been granted court approval to be legally emancipated from his parents," shares CP.

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(This is an example of a transgender youth, showing the power of hormone therapy.)

The irony is that the child would not even be able to change his last name without parental approval, yet his mother was able to be robbed of her right to know that her son was given life-altering drugs to try to change his gender!

Calgaro said, "I believe my constitutional civil rights to have my case heard in a court of law has been stripped from me. If this had been a child custody case, I would have had my day in court. If my son were being placed in foster care, I would have had my day in court. Or if he had been referred to child protection, I would have had my day in court.

"I am firmly committed to what is best for me son. I am his mother and he has always been and always will be welcome in our home," she added. "As a mother, I know his physical and emotional needs in a way no one else can. I also have a commitment to him that no one else has. I feel that not only was I robbed of the opportunity to help and guide my son make good decisions but I also feel that he was robbed of a key advocate in his life — his mother."

If this can happen to a 17 year old (a minor), who says it can't happen to a 12 year old? Or a 7 year old? Where are the rights of the parent? 

According to Calgaro's lawyer, she plans to appeal. And we hope she does! This kind of ruling cannot go unchallenged! Do you agree? Share your thoughts in the Comments! Thank you!