Pope Francis' Secret Meeting With Kim Davis

popefrancis.jpg

It has just been confirmed that Pope Francis met with Kim Davis, the Kentucky county clerk imprisoned for standing against same-sex marriage, while on his recent U.S. visit.

Vatican spokesman Rev. Federico Lombardi told the New York Times, “I do not deny that the meeting took place, but I have no other comments to add,” as Life Site News reports.

kim-davis-600x338.jpg

Sneaked into the Vatican Embassy for about 15 minutes, Kim Davis gave this account in Inside the Vatican:

“The Pope spoke in English. There was no interpreter. ‘Thank you for your courage,’ Pope Francis said to me. I said, ‘Thank you, Holy Father.’ I had asked a monsignor earlier what was the proper way to greet the Pope, and whether it would be appropriate for me to embrace him, and I had been told it would be okay to hug him. So I hugged him, and he hugged me back. It was an extraordinary moment. ‘Stay strong,’ he said to me. Then he gave me a rosary as a gift, and he gave one also to my husband, Joe. I broke into tears. I was deeply moved."

“Then he said to me, ‘Please pray for me.’ And I said to him, ‘Please pray for me also, Holy Father.’ And he assured me that he would pray for me.”

Kim Davis is not Catholic, but one of her parents is, and Pope Francis has stood in support of Kim during the controversy. When asked by ABC reporter Terry Moran about the rights of those who stand in opposition to same-sex marriage, the pope responded:

Conscientious objection is a right that is a part of every human right. It is a right. And if a person does not allow others to be a conscientious objector, he denies a right. Conscientious objection must enter into every juridical structure because it is a right, a human right. Otherwise we would end up in a situation where we select what is a right, saying ‘this right that has merit, this one does not.’ It (conscientious objection) is a human right.

We are happy to see the pope standing so strong for the rights of those in our country that are being stripped away. We need strong voices like his to speak to our leaders. Do you agree?