Charlie Gard’s Dad Emotional Interruption In High Court Over Terminally Ill Son

family
July 10, 2017

The father of terminally ill baby Charlie Gard interrupted the U.K.'s High Court of Justice today with an Emotional Interruption directed at a lawyer representing the hospital that’s treating his son.

"When are you going to start telling the truth?" Chris Gard yelled at the attorney.

Their legal battle with doctors to prolong Charlie's life has gained international attention, with Pope Francis and US President Donald Trump

Gard and Connie Yates -- the parents of 11-month-old Charlie-- attended the High Court hearing today hoping for a decision that would determine the infant’s future, but they were forced to wait until Thursday.

Judge Nicholas Francis gave the couple until Wednesday to present new evidence showing that their child should receive an experimental treatment that the couple believes could help their son.

The court hearing came a day after Yates and Gard made a public appearance to state that their son "deserves a chance" to be taken to the United States for an experimental treatment.


After Charlie’s Parents left court Monday, a family friend read a statement expressing appreciation from Yates and Gard: "Charlie's parents look forward to the new evidence being heard before the High Court this Thursday 13th July that will result in Charlie's parents taking him to either the United States of America or to Italy for ground breaking treatment."


Charlie is battling mitochondrial depletion syndrome, a rare genetic disease that causes a significant drop in mitochondrial DNA in affected tissues. Symptoms can be any combination of myopathic, hepatopathic, or encephalomyopathic. These syndromes affect tissue in the muscle, liver, or both the muscle and brain, respectively. The condition is typically fatal in infancy and early childhood, though some have survived to their teenage years with the myopathic variant and some have survived into adulthood with the SUCLA2 encephalomyopathic variant.


The hospital and European courts have prevented Gard's parents from seeking experimental treatment outside of Britain. Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital have argued that the treatment will not help and could cause further suffering. They have sought and received permission from the courts to withdraw life-sustaining treatment and provide palliative care only.